OSTRICH BOYS

“What’s this then? Facing your fear? Or running away?”

‘superbly and funnily adapted by Carl Miller … everything one could wish for: a scintillating show, mostly comic but also tinged with guilt and tension … it’s impossible to fault this show. Worth six stars – I couldn’t recommend it too highly’
★★★★★
Roderic Dunnett COVENTRY TELEGRAPH

ADAPTATION, DRAMA, FAMILY AUDIENCE, FULL-LENGTH PLAY, VERSION SUITABLE FOR A LARGE CAST, VERSION SUITABLE FOR YOUTH COMPANIES | two separate versions, one for 4 actors, one for a large cast

Want to perform or produce OSTRICH BOYS?

from the book by Keith Gray

four actor version

first perfomed in Korean by Kim Ji-hun, Kim Pyung-jo, O Jeong-taek and Park Yong-u; first performed in English by Carl Au, Shea Davis, Fred Haig and Faaiz Mbelizi

directed by Tony Graham
designer Jason Southgate (Coventry)
set designer Shin Sung-ryul (Seoul)
costume designer Kang Ki-Jung (Seoul)
lighting designer Kim Hyoung-yeon (Seoul) Arnim Freiss (Coventry)
composer and sound designer John Avery (Coventry)
music director Jang Hyuk-joe (Seoul)
movement director Kwon Young-ho (Seoul) Tom Jackson Greaves (Coventry)
translator (Seoul) Park Young-hoon

additional credits below

large cast version

first performed by Daniel Ali, Ben Baulch-Jones, Thomas Chiverton, Ellen D’Andrade Brown, Heather Fantham, Thomas Fenn, Daisy Field, Rebecca Flitcroft, Grace France, Kieran Holland, Ellie Jones, Shannon Morris, Kyle Peterkin, Dore Robinson, Holly Smith, Joseph Turner, Pip Turner, Daniel Woodall, Jack Woodbridge, Letitia Wright and Anna Youle

directed by Hannah Phillips
designer Rob Dicks
lighting designer Adrian Littlejohns
composer Sayan Kent
visual artist Adam Guy / We Make Art

JOURNEYS

PROGRAMME NOTE FOR THE REVIVAL OF THE SEOUL PRODUCTION

One of the joys of a journey is that you always arrive somwehere different from your destination. Like Blake, Sim and Kenny in Ostrich Boys, it may be that you reach the intended geographical goal – Ross – but that you also arrive at a psychological place in your life you had not expected. Without, I hope, giving too much of the story away, I feel that these characters arrive somewhere radically different in their inner lives as a result of their outer journey.

When I first started work on Ostrich Boys, I never realised that it would take me on a geographical journey to Seoul! Had I known that this story would end up being staged by NTCK, I would probably have made many different decisions – all of them wrong ones! I would have tried to second-guess what the story might mean for Korean audiences, rather than discovering – as I did when I came to the production last year – that you would make up your own minds about that.

One of the wonderful things about being a playwright is finding how a story which is very specific to one time and place can speak vividly to audiences in another. In part, that is because what we share as human beings is so great. The emotions and struggles of the characters that the novelist Keith Gray created in Ostrich Boys are beautifully well-observed. Because of his care and attention to detail, they are recognisable young people to audiences in Coventry (where Tony Graham directed the play in English for the first time earlier this autumn) and in cities in Korea.

But they are also different. I learned a lot about the play from seeing it for the first time in Korean. Yes, we discovered plenty of things that do not translate directly, but many more which resonate richly and strangely in this production and the wonderful performances of these actors. They taught me to understand the play in new ways, and I am delighted that they are once again going on this imaginative journey across country together.

produced by the Belgrade Theatre

trainee assistant director Katherine Allen
casting director Debbie O’Brien
production manager Adrian Sweeney
company stage manager Steve Cressey
deputy stage manager Rosanna Simpson
assistant stage manager Amy-Marie Field

produced by NTCK / Theatre for Young Audiences Research Centre
producer Kim Mi-sun
art education director Choi Young-ai

interpreters Park Mi-Kyong, Kim Shinu and Jung Hae-soo
assistant directors Kwak Jung-eun and Park Sang-hee
dramaturgy Jung Su-jin
stage manager Moon Once-up
stage production director Kim Sun-tae
technical director Shin Yong-soo
sound supervisor Jung Youn-suk and Choi Hwan-seok
lighting director Shin Dong-sun
costume staff Hong Mun-ki, Park Si-young and Noh Keyung-min
set production Stage Big Bell (Park Dae-jong)
lighting assistant Kim Dae-hyun
lighting operator Yoo Hye-jin and Lee Myung-han
sound operator Lee Hyeon-goo
stage crew Son Han-sung
costume crew Shin Joo-yeon
prop crew Mo Jae-yeon
stage staff Yang Dae-hun
lighting team Yun Ui-sun, Choi In-su, Kwak Tae-jun and Hong Yu-jin
photographers Lim Young-hwan, Jang Sung-yong, Jung Won-gyun